Chicken Coop


Chickens are our newest addition to the Bergen County Zoo!
The coop is located at the entrance of the Northside of the red barn.

These chickens have a special privilege no other animal here has,
during the day these chickens are allowed to roam the zoo!

You might see them on the path, by the stream, or grazing an empty field. See if you can spot of 12 of them!

Please DO NOT feed, touch, chase, or kick them
Please be respectful to their personal space and observe them from a comfortable distance.
What Chickens do we have?




Here at the Bergen County Zoo, we have 12 Dorking Chickens. This breed of chickens are calm and friendly.  Adults weigh about 8 to 10 pounds and our chickens have white or silver-gray feathers. 








The first thing you may notice on them is their comb, the red Crest on top of their heads. The Dorking Chicken have a large comb. They have shorter legs then the average chicken. Dorking Chickens have distinct  feet with 5 toes  on each foot, which makes them the only bird to have 5 toes. The fifth toe is not so useful as it does not touch the ground. They lay white or slightly off-white eggs.


The first thing you may notice on them is their comb, the red Crest on top of their heads. The Dorking Chicken have a large comb. They have shorter legs then the average chicken. Dorking Chickens have distinct  feet with 5 toes  on each foot, which makes them the only bird to have 5 toes. The fifth toe is not so useful as it does not touch the ground. They lay white or slightly off-white eggs. 
The first thing you may notice on them is their comb, the red Crest on top of their heads. The Dorking Chicken have a large comb. They have shorter legs then the average chicken. Dorking Chickens have distinct  feet with 5 toes  on each foot, which makes them the only bird to have 5 toes. The fifth toe is not so useful as it does not touch the ground. They lay white or slightly off-white eggs. 





The Dorking Chicken is generally bred for their meat and eggs but were near extinction after the second world war. They have bounced back when groups started conservation efforts to breed them again but they are still a rare breed.

Please do not feed, touch, chase, or kick them.